Students care
Tags:
April 18, 2013
Tags:
April 18, 2013

The word apathy has been thrown around throughout my stay in the University. Many professors continue to criticize students because all they care about is according to these professors, “getting a good job in a multinational corporation that pays extremely well.”

 
The argument that people lack interest, concern or enthusiasm, collectively known as apathy, has reached most of the sectors of the University.

 
Even student leaders have used the word for a good amount of reason in explaining why most Lasallians do not attend events that cater to the less privileged. Moreover, apathy has become one of the greatest and sadly, the strongest justification for the University Student Government’s (USG) and other Council of Student Organizations (CSO) members’ choice of projects— parties, games and all.
And while the proceeds of the projects go to the less privileged, somehow, it means much less since most students bank on their existing competency—money in their pockets, and the ability to convince professors to give incentives to compensate for the money lost.

 
The evidence is everywhere. Most USG or CSO sponsored activities that would actually help Lasallians contribute to society or at least bring them out of their comfort zones have suffered low attendance rates because as many put it: people just don’t care.

 
And what’s even more alarming is that many communities around us are starting to notice our apathy and our growing brand— that is, an expensive and a pretty much Darwinian dog-eat-dog kind of community.

 
The worst part is that many students forget to fight for themselves and for each other. The dwindling number of grievance cases, which bank on the unity of a class and its conviction, is enough proof to show that students are not yet starting to think for themselves.

 
Instead of helping each other and making sure that they actually get to learn from their professors, many students focus on easy 4.0s and tolerate professors who constantly step on their rights for as long as they pass.

 
And while there are those professors, students and staff who continue to believe that our community cares, it is difficult to blame those who have repeatedly tried and failed to change our culture when they say that Lasallians do not care at all.

 
The conclusion is inevitable—Lasallians must be apathetic, but somehow, I find this hard to swallow. How can a hundred year old institution that has contributed to the country in various ways—research, leaders and innovators—suddenly freeze over? How could our education, which was built on progressive ideals suddenly regress?

 
I stumbled upon my answer a couple of weeks ago. I was trying to find any piece of evidence that I could stumble upon to prove that Lasallians do care. I looked at some University-led and USG projects and of course, the proceeds that came with them, but found little evidence of real student participation.

 
And like all people who could not get an answer, I turned to our favorite pastime—Facebook. While checking notifications, I read a story a friend of mine posted on Facebook. He bought a gold necklace from a person along Taft, knowing that it was stolen with the intention of returning it to the owner.

 
The answer hit me when I asked myself: how could Lasallians be apathetic when one Lasallian went out of his way to find a complete stranger to return something he bought? And while many can argue that he could just be one of the exceptions, a quick look on any Lasallian’s Facebook would yield a pretty similar image—many Instagram photos, vacation photos, and more importantly, articles, stories and pictures that have comments and likes!

 
These are empirical and unquestionable pieces of evidence showing that Lasallians do care about the La Salle community and about the country. What is even more interesting is that if you look at the people commenting and sharing articles. These people are not the “best,” the “leaders”, the “popular” in the University; many of them are regular stakeholders of the University who many believe have no voice and no capability to share anything of value.

 
One quick look at our Facebook and website grounded my belief. In just a year, our website received more than a million page views and more than 800 comments, most of which come from Lasallians. Moreover, many of these comments offer relevant and constructive suggestions and inputs on the topics discussed, which can only lead to one definitive conclusion—Lasallians care.

 

But one question remains unanswered. If many Lasallians care online, why don’t they attend the activities? Why can’t they fight for each other? Why can’t we transcend this culture back to the University?

 
Perhaps we have looked at the problem in the wrong way. Instead of looking at the students, maybe it is time that we look at the institutions at DLSU, which assumed in the first place that students don’t care.

 
To be fair, the USG and the University have done many things worthy of being called ‘in line’ with the Lasallian mission, but while these institutions have done much, they have clearly lacked in treating students as relevant stakeholders, who have their own voice.

 
These institutions must understand that the first step in killing apathy is by proactively seeking the real participation of students. In this way, students would start feeling that that their voices matter.

 
The challenge is not at all easy, and will not be accomplished anytime soon. Projects are really hard to make, and as we make our way towards this ideal state, at times, we have to settle for something less for the greater good of the project. One thing, however, must not be lost in the process: it is the idea that students care.

  • Sean Yu

    The problem here is that most people think they are actually saving a
    child in africa by sharing and liking a picture. People think that by
    posting their “hopefuly educated opinion” on facebook that they have
    made an impact, that they have shown they care. All this is wishful
    thinking commercialized. Anyone could be a hero, just post your good
    deed in fb and wait for the likes. But that is the problem, the reason
    that people do ‘good deads’ is not for the sake of goodness, but for the
    sake of fb likes. Popularity is what drives a person, no one saves a
    child for free, everyone has their price. What fb does is give the
    person a sense of entitlement, that they are heroes, when in fact they
    are just attention mongers, gloryfying themselves with petty acts they
    wouldn’t have done anyway if they didn’t have their iphone to take a
    picture of it.

    Same is for the La sallian student culture. Mostly everyone is utilitarian, there must be some benefit to them for them to push through with it. No incentives for event, then no one will go. The irony is that almost everyone want the grade and not the learning. The problems is not that La salle isn’t proactive, the problem I see is that the attention is given to the wrong things. Learning over grades, Deeds over praise. That’s the way it should be. But then again, this is La Salle, the rich spoiled kids go here to play 2fuse on their iphones in class. That’s why they need the incentives to make up for their lack of brains. Since they can’t pay attention in class, then they might as well pay, using their parent’s money of course, for incentives. It’s like Church Indulgence, buying ones salvation, instead here we buy incentives, for ones 4.0 that is.

    • Anonymous

      I am guilty of what you said and I admire your straightforwardness in citing a critical issue. I share the observation that most Lasallians are indeed utility and fame junkies. This is further aggravated by professors who fail to impart the Lasallian values to their students and instead further encourage the greedy pursuit of utility either through the unreasonable difficulty that they place on impractical academic requirements or the leniency in which they freely give incentives.

  • Anonymous

    “The worst part is that many students forget to fight for themselves and for each other. The dwindling number of grievance cases, which bank on the unity of a class and its conviction, is enough proof to show that students are not yet starting to think for themselves.

    Instead of helping each other and making sure that they actually get to learn from their professors, many students focus on easy 4.0s and tolerate professors who constantly step on their rights for as long as they pass.

    And while there are those professors, students and staff who continue to believe that our community cares, it is difficult to blame those who have repeatedly tried and failed to change our culture when they say that Lasallians do not care at all.

    The conclusion is inevitable—Lasallians must be apathetic, but somehow, I find this hard to swallow. How can a hundred year old institution that has contributed to the country in various ways—research, leaders and innovators—suddenly freeze over? How could our education, which was built on progressive ideals suddenly regress?”

    While some may indeed be apathetic, I would also like to believe that some are enveloped by fear. Imagine the inconvenience of trying to push through with a grievance when you have other majors to worry about. Imagine this inconvenience being magnified by the fact that some students, such as myself, do not have the financial capability to risk failing and repeating a subject because of an unreasonable professor’s bitter power-tripping. As far as unprofessional professors (and maybe even staff are concerned), I honestly think that the problem is primarily the concern of the University’s HR, which I also believe has had lapses in hiring decisions.

    I admire how this article rouses activism. Unreasonable, unprofessional and incompetent professors and staff (you know who you are), beware!

    We are not paying P60k per term to be victims of your power-tripping and to be treated as means to your ladder-climbing in the academe and in the University’s corporate ladder.

    I know that a lot of students have seen and have suffered from dysfunctional systems existing in some of the University’s offices and academic departments. It’s time we fight for the quality of education and services we rightfully deserve.

  • Anonymous

    The issue on students getting easy 4.0 grades from professors should be upon the discretion of the HR and the students as well. In the hiring process of a professor, it should be with a teaching demo and a feedback from the students. There was one time, a professor-to-be demonstrated his teaching in our class, I was lucky to be given a demo critique form, and I placed there that he’s too old and that there is no interaction. But lo and behold, what was the use of my critiquing if after that term, I saw the professor teaching under the Finance Department. After his term of teaching, I heard a lot of bad feedback from many students, and to think that I was a critique that time, it really is not the fault of the students anymore, but of those who hire.

    Students won’t stop enrolling to easy 4.0 classes unless those easy 4.0 professors would be disbarred or removed with just cause. DLSU should have professors like the LOTR to whom you can learn a lot and so that students would strive more even if it’s just a general education course. The professors should be like those who are strict in requirements so that students would have the idea and earn the skill of striving for the best. In this case, students will think more how to get a 4.0 rather than how to chillax and where to go for a Happy Thursday.

  • Pingback: ccn2785xdnwdc5bwedsj4wsndb()

  • Pingback: 3nvb54wnxd5cbvbecnv5ev75bc()

  • Pingback: xmct5895ct4jt3d4yxtjgwj45tc3j()

  • Pingback: cheap insurance quote()

  • Pingback: silk dresses()

  • Pingback: dog walker()

  • Pingback: banheiras()

  • Pingback: security()

  • Pingback: papa john student discount()

  • Pingback: tacfit commando()

  • Pingback: pop over to this website()

  • Pingback: second hand clothes wholesale()

  • Pingback: aile hekimligi malzemeleri()

  • Pingback: guitar picks()